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Made In Buffalo - Dave Debo "Discovers" Dupont

Aug 15, 2014|

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  1. EBOLA: CBS's Paul Murnane Outside Bellvue Hosp in NYC

    Fri, 24 Oct 2014

    Doctor Craig Spencer is the fourth Ebola patient in the US the first in New York City. Joining us live on the WB and lifeline Palmer name from WCBS 880 in New York City outside Bellevue hospital Powell good morning. Good morning what we know about doctor Spencer was that he was out late. As Wednesday. Aldo on the he would come back to new York city of the added in October. And he had not been exhibiting. These victims of Ebola though he had been feeling tired it was yesterday morning Thursday morning. In which he. Was taking a temperature he saw that is spike to 103. He was this feeling sick. He called we here Doctors Without Borders that's the group he had been working or in West Africa before coming back to New York City. And that set in motion the what's described as an. Careful that a protocol. Of dealing with and transporting. Outpaced doctor. From his home in upper Manhattan to be isolation ward here at Bellevue hospital. Paul is our understanding that two the doctor also has been around. Manhattan. And here in this period went bowling we understand you rode the subway. And these areas being scrubbed our lot. Interesting a lie and it didn't get a got a wrinkle your nose and into little bit when you see that as spokesman for the FDA. You're New York City in the daily news this morning it saying that they're the agency at this series and here now and I'll quote. Dealing with everything from influenza a west island cabling. Potentially. Infectious waste on the subway. Like up blood and vomit and you're in the so unfair reviewing their plan they're in contact with the help expert they say and their labor organizations you know he was not the one. BL and the A train. He also used the movers cart circuit. To go to a bowling Alley in the the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn. They had been in contact with the driver of that car according to help officials they consider him to be at the low risk. A transmission. But we also see that up. They have been in contact with him and quarantine are Spencer's beyoncé. And they didn't know that talking with to a distress. New York city's mayor and Governor Cuomo held a news conference last night and basically they were saying that the city. Is ready for this right they've been waiting finance. Yet governor almost bet it is New York City this is something that if you didn't make anyone necessarily by surprise. We have the international airports surrounding the city. Newark and at JFK. It's the center for international medicine. Our doctor Spencer was in Guinea oh wit that Doctors Without Borders. Key it's that could be a specialist in international. Emergency medicine. He works at. New York presbyterian Columbia University Medical Center sound out of the hospital saying in the statement. That he had not seen any patient. And had not been back to work that he came back to New York City on October 17. Paul how equipped is build your hospital handled it. Bellevue is it's a renowned resource in New York City or. Medical emergencies. I was surprised they ante up and a news conference over here a couple of weeks ago which they brought out the medical cheap and help out corporation which is the city public health that from the hospital here. Gates surprised that by saying that they had four. Rooms opt for and root for isolation that didn't seem like very much they told to rip and a very quickly. And then we were brought over to an isolation room that's off the emergency room ER. And they'll abuse the medical chief. Which showed me and some of the reporters other protective gear that. Believe that the stat here. I can aware. We're hearing that under these protocols that we used to transport and street yesterday that. The people who responded we're used to bring in your ability. They were sprayed down and they're protected year with a mixture including Leach and then their work cut out. They're protective gear and the ambulance that was used to bring Spencer to Bellevue and the ties that he was brought. It's still early in the morning but. Powell New Yorkers reacting think they'll be a drop off an end subway travel today here. And I think that's the question I'm in the Governor Cuomo is going to be on the network morning shows. More I think that I'm that they want showed that. You know they're taking steps. And they want to emphasize the message that other risk that Ebola. In the general public got its low. The question is are people going to area I'm due later. Do beer they're they're daily thing you didn't talk to people bid that there is some concern. And I told you about that news conference to build you a while back at a PG city. He came out and pull this through all the reporters that. Yeah we understand the anxiety that you know we're in the middle of the story we don't really know exactly how this thing is going to end. So it authorities understanding anxiety. And and regret the see what today that it bobbled a these brain in terms of how. New Yorkers react to that. Paul we're glad you could join us this morning thank you so much. Great that's Palmer name from WCBS 880 in New York City outside Bellevue hospital.

  2. More with Dr. Brahm Segal on Ebola

    Fri, 24 Oct 2014

    The New York City doctor are receiving specialized treatment dollar billion hospital after testing positive for a bullet. WB on Tuesday Google has the latest on this confirmed case of new York and John it's significant because obviously of New York city's population density. You know the word at all right now can spread fear that it's here in New York it's. More Governor Cuomo last night joined with other health officials to address the issue Europeans against place. A lot of people on top of each other but Cuomo saying that because station Craig Spence it was a doctor and took his temperature twice today watching percent of since coming back from Africa. The risk is there for a low. New York City health commissioner Bassett says though there's another issue here. That during that time. That the patient was home before he became sick he did leave his apartment he went on a three mile jog. We know that he's ridden on the date change. The number one train the L thing we're still. Getting more information about this but we note that yesterday that he went to bowling Alley and Williamsburg. He was feeling well at that time. Or bowlers from that facility Aaron quarantine New York City as what they call it disease detectives out and about tracing his travels. And at least one of those bowlers is in quarantine with him at Bellevue the other is at home Genesis. Okay Dave thank you for that doctor brand Siegel is with us in studio this morning. Chief of infectious disease at Roswell park cancer institute and we're taking your questions for doctor Siegel under text line at 30930. And at news radio 930 and Twitter and also on her FaceBook page to. Doctor Siegel of one question has come and shouldn't this doctor has tested positive for evil and before you came back to the US even though he wasn't symptomatic. Now and that's one of limitations that would be great if we have a test. That we could administer let's say where it win win travelers come back to a US hobby airport. That would predict that they would develop. Ebola disease. It in the near future in a week or ten days. And that does not exist so the testing. That we leave that that that is done for Ebola is only once someone has become ill in a lit up the development temperature first was that the first signed. Usually fevers the first time in that first time it's a flu like illness so it kind of comes together. That fever muscle aches headaches and gastrointestinal symptoms usually kind of comes together at that time. It is possible to detect the virus. Is a test coming like that it could tell us whether or not your carrier for Ebola not. No I have heard no. No information. That there would be a test and you would be actually the ideal test. That would say you've been exposed to Ebola and here is your risk for developing over the next. Couple weeks I know of no test that can do that we have vaccines for just about everything. Doctors legal one not some one help us. After what that's done and West Africa in the past almost forty years. Well we might that we don't have there are vaccine candidates we certainly don't have one right now. But our researcher and I am pro research and add to a large extent our ability. As as a country to develop vaccines for things like Ebola. Dot and other infectious diseases or even vaccines against cancer. Which is a major interest area of interest at Roswell park. It depends on. Researchers who are committed. To doing the work and public policy that that funds the work. How soon are far far away are we from a vaccine. Have no idea about that I I know that there are. We're right now. Way we treat he'll people with the ball as what we call support of cares there's nothing specific that we use against the virus. We controlled the the illness OK so lungs failed we put them on events later the kidneys fail dialysis. In terms of specific. Mitt medications from either vaccines are antibodies. That are that that are targeted towards the virus that is the at a very early stage of development. So. It's it's nothing that could be used off the shelf right now. People are wondering. How does this virus. Mutate and that's the right or you know we know the virus was discovered some forty years ago. In West Africa in a cave. It was brought to the US the virus was brought to the USA. Almost forty years ago to a laboratory. In Reston Virginia another virus they believe that the time was cured by monkeys and bats as any of this read his research changed any of this. Is he acts yet well. I Ebola existed before forty years ago but the first recognized out operate right. Was in the Ebola river area are and key in the in the Congo. In terms of the rest then. The Reston in. Incident I believe what happened. Is that you had Ebola infected monkeys are price meats or brought. They were brought to Virginia not specifically steady ball up but they beat these animals became very ill. And Ebola can. I can in fact. Prime mates nine prime meats such as monkeys and even fruit bats that are are endemic to Africa. So when these are old world monkeys came to Virginia to evade to the surprise of the researchers they were actually diagnosed with Ebola. Mean they became very ill and for evaluation showed that they had Ebola. Fortunately to my knowledge there was no monkey to T human transmission. To my knowledge it it it was caught early but he it goes to show that you know there is there's different potential reservoirs. In which. In which people can exist it's not unique to humans. It's OK another question has come in this morning we did address this a little while ago I think it's worth bringing back up. If you come in contact with bodily fluids is that enough to be infected or does it have to sign an entry into the body like on a cut or something like that. The exposure. It it doesn't have to do occur through a cut so that that's. It can occur through mucous membrane exposure. Eight again these parties. Fluid particles can be very small so it can be swallowed it could be exposure to the mouth exposure to the eyes. In terms of skin contact there could be what's called micro operations that are very tiny you don't seek. So the people who would have required. Eight people let's not as if they had an open cut during that era. If it can indeed penetrate mucous membranes. And skin exposure when there's an intensive bodily floats food exposure over skin that can that that can also be a way that it's transmitted. That's very different. That's very different than I shaking hands or cough or sneeze we're talking about someone a patient who is very ill. Who is excoriating the virus through many different ways including bleeding. You're in diarrhea and sat truck and then you have people who are in close contact with that person that is the most common way it would be transmitted to health care. Okay and more coming up with a lower in studio guest doctor brand Segal chief of infectious disease at Roswell Park Cancer Institute doctor singles also professor. In the UB department of medicine in the school of medicine and bio chemical sciences. And a doctor Siegel we were just talking about how you get people and here's another question honest to what about sweat from an arm. To another term or sweat from my hand on a subway railing to someone's hand. By itself or that second person's hand to an opening on his body like eyes nose mouth or from someone with symptoms that sneezes. And someone that nearby in hails those particles. So a lot of good questions and I would. Return to what I. Sat at the opening. Let's do a thought experiment in the imagine that Ebola was transmitted that way. Through casual contact through a CD's that person may touches person be with and touches person C. What would it look like what with the spread beat it and it would look nothing like what we're seeing right now. Casual contact easy contact likely get with common respiratory of Ireland has that infections and quote unquote stomach flu were one person gets it and lots of people get it. That. It is that where that transmission it wouldn't be confined to the three countries. Where it is affected right now. On in the Sierra Leone and Liberia and Guinea. It wouldn't have been. Controlled like it was in Nigeria when they had an important case from Liberia. At the transmission would be much more rapid. Right and it would spread it would be widespread so. Everything about the epidemiology. That we're observing with the current outbreak which is much more severe than prior ones. Over a forty year period since Ebola was first described is telling us that that casual contact is not the mode of transmission. Speaking of these countries in West Africa I think it's Liberia have I'm not mistaken just made a public statement that the country is now. Ebola. Virus free tourism and the economies of these countries must be greatly impacted. People don't want. Travel there. OK so let's make. A distinction like the area with an Al is not Ebola free it's. It's. That is a cat catastrophic. Ebola outbreak that is going in Liberia. Nigeria. With an end. That is Ebola free so what happened. In with Nigeria is that over the summer there was an up imported case that. A passenger flown from Liberia to Lagos the capital of Nigeria. He had become ELP it's spreading to others a total of money. Patience with in Nigeria. Acquired the disease they mobilized after a lapse they mobilized their public health. Resource is a again Nigeria but it it is a wealthy country with the health care infrastructure. And they were able to control the epidemic so that the last case of Ebola. In Nigeria. Occurred. More than six weeks ago so based on the known incubation period. Com Ebola that is now being called disease for you just mentioned they were able to control the virus. If they can control. The virus. To an extent why can't they develop a vaccine to prevent it. I selects a little little let me explain how they control the pain control that through infection control. They control that through our contact tracing for isolation. Not through any medicine in me would be the best thing if we had an anti viral medicine like we have for influenza. That we can give to people that does not exist so the way they control it is through. Infection control methods not through and not through a vaccine or a new anti viral agent. We're talking about the first Ebola case in New York City with doctor brand Siegel. In studio this morning chief of infectious disease at Roswell Park Cancer Institute he's also professor and UB department of medicine and the school of medicine and biomedical sciences. Doctor Segal if you were in New York City. Would you take the subway today in fact would you take the eight train which this doctor took just the other day. Absolutely yes I was. I was a med student. Several many years ago it AM New York City so I'm used to be a train and if I were there. I would not hesitate to do so again would you troubled West Africa to help this year. Very good question so. I have a full time job but Russell park right now so I I don't have I don't have a plan and don't have a plan to. Go to the West African areas that are affected. When we is a term West Africa it it's three countries that are effective so we we shouldn't even West Africa is very very big. So I it's the three countries that of that that are affected. I I personally I don't have a plan needs to go to. West Africa. As it as an aid worker I would say that. Might my expertise as an infectious disease specialist would would not be of great value. Because we don't have specific antibiotics. Anti viral to give. The people who are most suited to help are those that have experience working in the field out there. Web experience working in in our. More resource challenged countries are poor countries that lack the infrastructure. And basically giving the support of care so Doctors Without Borders where this doctor had. Had joined the day and other organizations. Are really the ones where best qualified to deliver care fight decide to go there. I would need to be trained by them. And terms of giving the support of care with out the infrastructure that I'm used to it Roswell park. And that makes sense but here's another question of which I think is an interest in Gary interest in question. You say asymptomatic people do not need to be quarantined. Then why is this doctors fiance to friends and a bowler now quarantined wired they'd just been told the monitor their temperatures what's the difference. Very good questions of the first I would say when the term quarantine is news I am not sure it's being used sort of loosely. Or in a strictly when I think of scoring team it means. You are at home so we were going to be quarantined in this studio room means we're staying here. And I I don't know if that level of of quarantine is being applied or is it's it's a term that's being used a little bit more. More loosely in the press. I can tell you that from federal. Guidelines. Popcorn team is. It is what we would not be advice for people. Who are are asymptomatic even with a known. In bowl exposure and then if we look at the if bola exposes that occur. Obviously the greatest storm would be his girlfriend. I would make a distinction between household member a close friend like a girlfriend. First is someone bowling in the next Alley. But the bowler is beyond me I can't understand why our enough that's a self imposed quarantine or. Or or whether the local or state officials are going way beyond federal guidelines. You may have heard Governor Cuomo whose warnings say just the mention. Of the workable. Frightens a lot of people. Two people in buffalo right now have anything to worry about. People in buffalo should be concerned about global. Crises. Like Ebola global met. You know medical catastrophes. Whether it's an Ebola outbreak or tsunami. Or at an earthquake we should absolutely be concerned in terms of our own risk for infection which is a separate question. As I said before. I do expect cases of Ebola to be sporadic Lee imported to the United States at. More so when in the major cities like New York City that than buffalo but. We can have people in buffalo. Who may want to go to an Ebola affected area and offer their services right. Scioscia was in association with Doctors Without Borders or other groups. We can imagine that it's this that there can be imported cases of Ebola. Anywhere throughout the country and but again I'm I mentioned the word sporadic several times sporadic meaning isolated. Not that this is gonna lead to to an outbreak here in the United States but we have to have an infrastructure that we recognize. Early cases of Ebola that we're monitoring cases that are imported. And that we have reasonable infection control precautions so that they remain. Isolated another great question the infected patients. Must be having gastrointestinal symptoms at home before entering hospitals. With that said is the water treatment system in the US equipped to filter the Ebola Virus in the patients flashed waste. Yes say it would be. The ability for Ebola to survive outside. The body is is is limited under. Ideal laboratory conditions we're actually. Intentionally. Create the conditions where the virus can survive outside the body it can survive a number of days but. When you wouldn't we are going through way a eight develop. System of of of waste removal like we have here in buffalo that is not present. In corps air ate it in in the rural areas of Liberia and Guinea. The air we have the ability that it it it's actually quite a frat child virus. And that it would be destroyed very quickly and I would have zero concern about tap water use. Where it's being transmit turns me in that fashion contrast that to assess the situation where the sewage system. He is rudimentary. Horror basically nonexistent. That is the situations we get in the poorest countries where. You can have Ebola. Being transmitted in that fashion what we call fecal oral or. You know contaminated waste that then can be transmitted. To someone else doctor we've learned a great deal from you I'm sure our listeners have to and we're grateful for you commend and thank you so much from right in our studio guest doctor brown Segal chief of infectious disease that Roswell Park Cancer Institute doctor Siegel. Also professor Liu B department of medicine in the school of medicine and biomedical sciences.

  3. EBOLA: Dr Brahm Segal MD & CBS's Heather Bosch in NYC

    Fri, 24 Oct 2014

    Good morning everyone let's go live now to New York should they receive BS's other to anybody Schaub above above the latest in the the ball to scare. In New York City Heather isn't really a scare Telus which can tell us. Well we understand that epic Craig Spence there it has that are people out he was check it yet they ain't. CDC and team and at that however to double check that I won't sit. I think you know we are handling everything with an abundance hostage and the doctor Hewitt in West Africa. Had been treating Ebola patient. So when he came back. Eight site. Back in without order we put our ultimate take it temperature a couple of times everyday and watch for instance. Yes well well the first time you woke up it is Il. Activist temperature was 100 street he had diarrhea immediately all how the and so even ambulance they imported into double hop battle here. I had a better especially rain they were wearing protective ear. Being rushed in Italy I probably shouldn't you match here in Bellevue hospital it only one at eight. What people who are trained to handle any old issue. Okay now how many people did he come in contact with close contact before he got sick before he went to the hospital. That is great practice team yet it's aren't great and chief Brent that he didn't hanging out all of them that they foreign gene as a in addition the they are built a while he has said. Health officials that we creeping all of his stat. Just see it. Other people may have been exposed theaters it did take that up well. He I'd have writing in its act its act are all that he is not at Rick but nevertheless they're checking that out anyway all right. That's another place where we expect health officials the heat are in the people how well unpack each of that this guy. But again they let the cat that all of our electric ancient art Leach was without it symptomatic. We you know New Yorkers are a resilient group we've known that now. Is there any indication that people are worried about this the average guy on the street I mean like staying off the subway maybe after during the the doctor rode the subway. You don't get ET at the and out here are some people who are a little bit aren't about to get what happened Alice McGee dot other but they say well you know. It seem to be handled very well and ever new York and the benefit of what he what happens to Al. Duncan became so we're equally well. And nurses there's saying it baby we're not trained properly handle it (%expletive) like that. You're they've had yet I'd I'd wake when he set up there will be protocols. And people understand that is Eric gay in people who have caught Ebola treating other cheating Asians that are making it very. Heather we thank you for your time this morning. Any. That CBS is another bosh live from New York. And where we are very pleased to have in studio this morning doctor brand Siegel. Chief of infectious disease at Roswell park cancer institute and will take your questions to for doctor Siegel or text line at 30930. Also at news radio 930 and Twitter and our FaceBook page as well doctor Siegel thanks so much for coming and we appreciate your question I see you can. Any surprise TO that Ebola has come to New York City. Not specifically a surprise that there would be an additional case so. When I was in your studio last week here in the affected West African areas that work. About 9000. Total cases west that is in that affect the West Africa countries. Over the past week it's now the total cumulative number of of cases is close to 101000. So as the epidemic increases in West Africa are going to be people health care workers like this position. Who are going to go there and and try to help out and that is absolutely crucial. I it is it is crucial not just for humanitarian reasons but also to protect ourselves. In the United States because cases will be imported with that being said we would expect to see. Isolated sporadic cases. Health care workers or others were coming back. Back to the United States who might have people. Okay. Again the actual. Risk of a single health care worker using appropriate precautions to get him bola. Is is very low but there are a lot of people there so we can expect on a sporadic. Individual level that there will be a case. That there will be sporadic cases in the future. No we know that in most cases in West Africa serious cases available. Nine out of ten victims. Die. Now the doctors and lose doctor Spencer from New York City. Members of groups like Doctors Without Borders and other agencies would go to help treatable victims I mean they have to know how serious this is. So whether on the way back to this country what precautions. What they have taken or should they have taken before coming back. OK very good question so. The fatality rate of Ebola it in this most recent outbreak isn't. If it is at nine out of ten it's closer to five out of ten about 50%. Under conditions. In West Africa and obviously Kent. Match the level of of of icu care that that we have been the United States still very very serious when you have a 50%. Mortality and people who reprieve previously healthy that's a very big deal. What is happening going forward is that the CDC and there are multiple into room. Guidelines are being put out and revisions. Starting early next week they're gonna have even more stepped up approach to follow travelers which would which would have included this position. That position New York City did exactly the right thing he reported things. Immediately when they occur but there's gonna be a more structured. Planned to. Follow up with travelers who come back United States and people affected areas. On a daily basis so not only is it an issue that they're instructed to monitor your temperature they will be in contact with public health. Officials on a daily basis through 21 days. We're getting questions that are coming in this morning people are wondering why he was allowed to wander around why is he was allowed to go bowling and taken a subway train and you know things like that. You know things are now in such flux with these guidelines. He as far as I know did not. He was fully aware there Rick risk. And was compliant with what he was told to do. I think going forward there might be that there will not be quarantined for asymptomatic. People who who packed travel. People endemic areas but for people like this position that obvious close exposure to Ebola patients. There might be what is called what the CDC is calling control movement or somewhat restricted movement. Where there is these hope that these people not be quarantined but they might say you know. Don't go on long trips don't go on cruise ship. Don't go on not on a flight across the country things of that nature. And these decisions I think will be made on the sort of an individual. Basis in consultation with the state. Public health and CDC to paint those. Not in place now be content coming well I saw them on the CDC web site. And I hear a I didn't see them a few days ago so I think that these. Who with with each case that occurs. There's a huge economic impact. And huge public health investment when you start and and huge. Just fear factor. So you could imagine if you have an Ebola and some with city bowl exposure coming back from let's say Liberia. And aid travel quite a bit to go on York city subways and and seven days later. They develop Ebola like symptoms you're now in a situation where there's fear and huge amount of contact tracing and anxiety. So my sense is if if based on their exposure. If they work with the public health authorities not quarantined but maybe we strict some of their movement within about 21 day incubation period. That might make sense and and again these are in flocks are not sure that it's fully implemented but I see it on the CDC website as of this morning. In our studio this morning is doctor brand Siegel think chief of infectious disease at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. We are taking your questions to. At 3930 on the text line and it news radio 930 and Twitter also our FaceBook page as well for doctor Siegel as there's eight. First case of Ebola in New York State it's in New York City doctor Siegel and this and bring us up to you of the Doctor Who came back from West Africa. Cleared screening and JFK airport he went through this new airport screening. On October 17. But to didn't. It's nothing showed up yet I mean it doesn't mean that the screening lines. Was you know deficient in anyway right it's. That's imprisoning QB should period for Ebola so he didn't have fever symptoms then but it. He'd go developed it and a week or so laughter. Are you so I. So he got through the screening and Bennett was you know until yesterday that he's just started feeling bad I mean even the day before it has its pricing he ran three miles. Now no there there and the incubation period. Can be as long as 21 days it usually isn't. But it can be as long does that. So he became ill as I understand it within about a week of his return from. From Guinea. So no that that was actually half as as would be expected. So that's a limitation. Of an airport screening in that it can't predict the future. Susan mentioned a few minutes ago that a one of our listeners and wanted to ask you why this doctor was allowed to meander all over Manhattan and Brooklyn. And after testing positive for the virus should he have been told. To limit his traveling and maybe stay and some kind of even limited isolation. So he. In terms of the big policy. In terms of how of whether there should be sound. Rules about. Restricted movement or what the CDC is now calling controlled movement. That may be happening in the future and in retrospect that does seem reasonable so if you are. Coming up but again we we have to frame this in a big way we absolutely need to have health care workers. Going to West Africa to try to contain the epidemic that's for humanitarian reasons and for our own safety. It's not going to be practical when these health care workers come back to say. Two imposed quarantine which is basically confinement in your house nor is it indicated from an infectious disease standpoint. Whether they'll be some middle of the road approach where someone who has an intensive people exposure like this position. Whether health officials will will. Whether they'll be laws or guidelines that say you know you should be restricting your movement in some way. I mean going for a walk around the block is perfectly fine but. Going on on subways or an airplane during that three week window may be to restrict that makes sense is he'll be done on case by case basis. We'll just have to see. Right another question it's coming and they keep stressing that you have to exchange bodily fluids with an infected person in order to catch it so. If if that is the case than most people don't have anything to worry about right. That is exactly the case. And we could think about it again a little bit more brightly we ask yourselves. What is the pattern of transmission of the virus that is easily transmit it. For casual contact their coffers means so we have great examples for that the flu. Think of the H1N1. Which is a flu epidemic in 2009 how rapidly spread. And think of the exact opposite. In terms of the Ebola outbreak can be if this were easily transmissible. Why would it be confined to three West African countries I would also say that it who remembered the imported case to Nigeria. Which then spread to twenty others but then was completely contained so that now Nigeria. He is classified by WHO is basically free. Of people this kind of pattern. Indicates from an epidemiological standpoint that you really do need. Bodily fluid exposures such as occurred with health care workers. Or with. Certain ceremonies. To. Certain a burial ceremonies and Africa which involve close contact or may be intensive. Household contacts. This this pattern which has been observed since suppose first describe forty years ago. Is exactly the pattern we're seeing with the current outbreak it just Signet it's just much more widespread than previous episode. Okay will a second part of the question from his listeners. And how is it that this doctor and why did these nurses from Texas how to they exchange bodily fluids with their patients like. I guess the term exchange of body volley bodily fluids it's it's one way exchange so. That the the patient is having guy. It in the case of Texas mr. Duncan and the the transmission occurred when he was extremely ill. In the hospital so. We could imagine what this and Ebola patient looked like who is very ill in an intensive care unit they may be an event later they may require dialysis. They're bleeding there's huge there's each amount of diarrhea and by Lisa crew. And the infection control precautions were far from my deal. Interest stating that his family members. When he was sent home he was not ill he was at fever right at fever muscle aches that sort of thing they did not contract people. The ball let really was transmit health care workers at the time that he was most ill. And where there's it if you can imagine the greatest opportunity for spread about bodily fluid. In our studio this morning is doctor brand Siegel think chief of infectious disease at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. We are taking your questions to. At 3930 on the text line and it news radio 930 and Twitter also our FaceBook page as well for doctor Siegel as there is eight. First case of Ebola in New York State it's in New York City doctor Siegel and this and bring us up to you of the Doctor Who came back from West Africa. Cleared screening at JFK airport he went through this new airport screening. On October 17. But it didn't. It's nothing China. I mean it doesn't mean at the screening lines. Was. You know deficient in anyway right it's just it. That's it there's an incubation period for Ebola so he didn't have fever symptoms and by the you don't developed it and a week or so laughter. Our itself. So he got through the screening and Bennett was you know until yesterday that he's just started feeling bad I mean even the day before it is pricey he ran three miles. Now no there there and the incubation period. Can be as long just 21 days it usually isn't. But it can be as long does that. So he became ill as I understand it within about a week of his return from. From Guinea. So no that that was actually. As as would be expected. So that's a limitation. Of an airport screening in the attic can't predict the future. Susan mentioned a few minutes ago though one of our listeners and wanted to ask you why this doctor was allowed to meander all over Manhattan and Brooklyn. After testing positive for the virus should he have been told. To limit his traveling in the bee sting and some kind of even limited isolation. So he. In terms of the big policy. In terms of how of whether there should be some. Rules about restricted movement or what the CDC is now calling controlled movement. That may be happening in the future and in retrospect that does seem reasonable so if you are. Coming up but again we equipped to frame this in a big way we absolutely need to have health care workers. Going to West Africa to try to Catania an epidemic that's for humanitarian reasons and for our own safety. It's not going to be practical when these health care workers come back to say. To impose quarantine which is basically confinement in your house nor is it indicated from an infectious disease standpoint. Whether they'll be some middle of the road approach where someone who has an intensity bowl exposure elect its position. Whether our health officials will will. Whether they'll be laws or guidelines that say you know you should be restricting your movement. In some way I mean going for walk around the block is perfectly fine but. Going on on subways or an airplane during that three week window. May be to restrict that makes sense is he'll be done on a case by case basis we'll just have to see. Right another question this coming and they keep stressing unity have to exchange bodily fluids with an infected person in order to catch him so. If the that is the case than most people don't have anything to worry about right. That is exactly the case. And we could think about it again a little bit more brightly we ask yourselves. What is the pattern of transmission of the virus that is easily transmit it. Or casual contact or cough or sneeze so we have great examples for that the flu. I think of the H1N1. Which is a flu epidemic in 2009 how rapidly it's Brett. And think of the exact opposite. In terms of the Ebola outbreak can be if this were easily transmissible. Why would it be confined to three West African countries I would also say that it remember the imported case to Nigeria. Which then spread to twenty others but then was completely contained so that now Nigeria. Is classified by WHO is basically free. People this kind of pattern. Indicates woman epidemiological standpoint that you really do need. Bodily fluid exposures such as occur with health care workers. Or with. Certain ceremonies. Certain a burial ceremonies and Africa which involve close contact for me be intensive. Household contacts this this pattern which has been observed since Apolo was first described forty years ago. Is exactly the pattern we're seeing with the current outbreak it just Signet it's just much more widespread than previous episode. Okay will a second part of the question from the listeners. And how is it that this doctor and why did these nurses from Texas how did they exchange bodily fluids with their patients like. I guess at that term exchange embodied volley bodily fluids it's it's a one way exchange so. That the the patient is having guy. It in the case of Texas mr. Duncan and the the transmission occurred when he was extremely ill. In the hospital so. We could imagine what does an Ebola patient look like who is very ill in an intensive care unit it may be an event later they may require dialysis. They're bleeding there's a huge there's a huge amount of diarrhea and bodily secretions. And the infection control precautions were far from my deal. Interest stating that his family members. When he was at home he was not ill he was at fever right at fever muscle aches that sort of thing they did not contract people. The bullet. Really outweighs transmit health care workers at the time that he was most ill. And where there's it if you can imagine the greatest opportunity for spread about bodily fluid. Okay we've got more with doctor Siegel he will be with us until about 8:30 this morning he's sent graciously given up this time. To answer some questions from you. And I text slang we're getting lots of and 30930. Doctor brand Segal chief of infectious disease at Roswell Park Cancer Institute.

  4. Bills Preview with Murph & Kelso

    Audio

    Fri, 24 Oct 2014

     

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Automatically Generated Transcript (may not be 100% accurate)

So they have let's talk about your visit to the DuPont plant -- well -- It's sort of talked between GM and the Dunlop plant exactly right it's it's actually it's got to the GM facility kind of to the south and across the way it's got the Ed Dunlop facility. It's at the confluence of river road in Sheridan drive about 95 acres it's pretty large facility. But it does sort of toil in obscurity and as you and how we're joking earlier. A lot of people don't necessarily seem to know what they make there. Well you've enlighten me you know growing up as a kid I can remember a DuPont to had -- paint. But no other end of the Korean which is one of the most popular items that he was making household good color -- absolutely -- they they have two main. Products they make their Korean. Which is basically yes as you said countertop. These days in this was kind of cool we will have photos online just a bit. They have an R&D facility there that works with. The material it's more than just counter tops they're developing and testing in machining and heat forming and molding and they're trying to develop new ways to use this thing so yes it's something that a lot of people know is countertop material. But they molded into shapes for chairs they have developed and this is really cool again you have to with the pictures. They've developed a way of engraving from the back so it's sort of like this luminous and slide showing pictures and murals on the walls. A lot of people are using it outdoors as well like on the outside of buildings to make it. Decorative and some point is that impervious to like bright sunlight and very much all those car. I don't know about the coloring per say but they they certainly they take a lot of time to work on things like what it looks like. There are corporate headquarters across the world to use this on the outside of the building to make it decorative. Most folks is that -- countertop know in their homes. Artists and designers are going nuts over this products that's number one that scoring in the one thing they make the other thing they make is something called Ted block. It's a polyvinyl chloride film. In an almost looked like an and they showed me a piece of it a piece of freezer paper. But it's used in all sorts of things. If you're walking through an error an airplane touched the sides of the inside -- on the baggage you're touching -- It's also a film that they use in the skin of the Goodyear blimp. So this is a very strong very lightweight impervious material. That is used in a lot of aeronautic applications that even now in the past couple years have started to put it. Inside solar cells outside on buildings because again is very impervious very thin very light weight. Both of these products are made at the time -- want to -- earlier in what are your reports Hewitt talked about. The man you were talked into Warner pointless sportsmen for DuPont described. This nesting material that your final supermarkets like wegmans and tops and inside there's nothing material which is -- bed. A large groups fruits vegetables things like that. Left is a product of Kevlar no no he when he mentioned that he was talking historically. And that's a netting called facts are it's one of the things they used to make there. This plant has an amazing Mosul is no longer made -- right now it's just Korean intent lab at the history is insisting and makes that netting material facts are. Back in the day this is where cellophane. Was first made and pioneer while back and today. This is where cellulose sponges were first made -- cellophane is still a big big product I guess not necessarily here at this plan but yes. They're back in the day this was the plan that first pioneered radeon. So they've got this very history of advanced materials and now they've decided to concentrate specifically on those two. The -- film. And the Korean counterattacks and mr. -- mentioned you 600. People are lucky to have employment there and many of them are in there. -- mid late forties sees it that's right he believes that within the next four years about half of the workforce will reach retirement age. So they're gearing up basically for hiring. They're reaching out to colleges they want people who can do things they don't necessarily need someone with an academic degree. But they want someone who can do things who can learn things who is technical enough to be able to make things happen and keep the plant running. But isn't necessarily. A four year college graduate. Taking care of that and the other challenge that they say. Is taking care of kind of the institutional knowledge base bringing in new employees is great and they're gonna have to do that but he says is a real challenge to make sure that. All the things that people who are there now know. Doesn't go out the door when they do.

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